The Community Ecology Institute needs $28,000 by May 15 to save this Columbia farm

My April 11 blogpost about this farm and CEI’s vision is below. They’ve come so far that failure is not an option. Chiara D’Amore, Executive Director, wrote to me, “Every donation matters because it all adds up and large grantors are interested knowing how many people are invested in seeing this farm be protected and turned into a model for how people can lead happier, healthier, more connected, and sustainable lives.

It’s a six-acre organic farm smack dab in the middle of Columbia’s Hickory Ridge Village that the Shaw family has worked for almost 40 years. The nonprofit Community Ecology Institute (CEI) wants to save the farm from development but needs to raise $300,000 by the middle of May to make it happen. There are a multitude of reasons why we need to support them.

Chief among them is CEI understands the impact that climate change may have on our community. They are committed to being a model for sustainable practices and teaching the skills of Mitigation, Adaptation and Resilience. Learn about their vision and help support it if you can. It’s a worthy cause and important for the future of Columbia and Howard County, Md.

Harry Schwarz – April 11, 2019

Community Ecology Institute: Growing a farm into a living classroom in Howard County [EXCERPTS]

Janene Holzberg (Baltimore Sun), March 22, 2019

Chiara D’Amore wants to transform a small organic farm in Columbia into a living classroom for the nonprofit she founded in 2016 with a mission to reconnect people to the natural world.

Community Ecology Center Site plan (courtesy of Community Ecology Institute) CLICK ON IMAGE FOR ENLARGED VERSION

D’Amore said CEI [Community Ecology Institute] is working to raise $300,000 to purchase Shaw Farm, a 6.4-acre property in a residential neighborhood near Atholton High School.

Having a facility at 8000 Harriet Tubman Lane would boost the nonprofit’s profile in the community and permit expanded programming, D’Amore said, while saving a 38-year-old family farm from development at the same time.

Aerial view, Shaw Farm (courtesy of Community Ecology Institute)

“There is a fire in me to protect this land,” said D’Amore, who has a master’s degree in environmental science and engineering and a doctorate in sustainability education.

If the farm purchase moves forward, a 4,000-square-foot barn on the property that is 75 percent finished would become classroom and office space.

The Shaw family sold organic produce for years at county farmers markets and donated thousands of pounds of vegetables and fruit to people in need, he said. They also sold produce in a community-supported agriculture program and later worked with food banks.

Shaw Farm (courtesy of Community Ecology Institute)

“Having been involved intimately with this land for almost 38 years, it is very important to me to find new stewards for the farm,” he stated.

“Working with Chiara and the other members of the Community Ecology Institute will ensure that my family’s values of clean air, water, soil and food — and putting people ahead of profits — will continue,” he wrote.

https://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/howard/bs-md-ho-community-ecology-institute-0324-story.html

The Community Ecology Institute

The Community Ecology Institute (CEI) is a Howard County based non-profit organization with a vision for a world in which human and natural communities thrive together. Our mission is to foster socially and ecologically healthy communities by enhancing the connections between all people and the natural world.

We are protecting this unique property from being developed and will be creating a Community Ecology Center where people can come to learn through hands on experiences about how they can have healthier, more sustainable lifestyles through:

  • Farm preservation & agricultural knowledge — There is little agricultural land left in eastern Howard County, especially in Columbia. Preserving this six-acre organic farm is a worthwhile endeavor in its own right!
  • Environmental sustainability & climate action — We will demonstrate and offer educational programming related to: conservation landscapes such as rain gardens, pollinator gardens, and food forests; . . . reducing waste through “refuse, reduce, reuse, and recycle” approaches; . . . energy and water efficiency; . . . and sequestering carbon in the soil.
  • Experiential education programming — CEI’s mission focuses on helping people develop strong connections with the natural environment because research shows how important such experiences are for people’s well-being, the generation of knowledge that makes a difference, and the cultivation of an active environmental ethic.
4,000 sq.ft. barn at Shaw Farm (courtesy of Community Ecology Institute)
  • Health & nutrition programming — farm to table programs that help the community connect with the benefits of eating local produce and space for community health practitioners to run programming
  • African American heritage programming — Local historians believe this area was an important point in the county’s Underground Railroad connections because 17 freed slaves were each given land in the community, hence the original name of Freetown.
Unfinished second floor of barn at Shaw Farm (courtesy of Community Ecology Institute)

https://www.communityecologyinstitute.org/community-ecology-center.html

Community Ecology Institute provides education on ways to mitigate climate change

As a coastal state and home to the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland is among the states most vulnerable to the effects of climate change through increases in sea levels, precipitation events, summer heat waves, and the frequency and intensity of storms. CEI is a signatory of the We Are Still In Agreement, and through the Community Ecology Center we seek to educate and support individuals, families, organizations, and communities on the local effects of climate change and empower them to harness local opportunities for action through Mitigation, Adaptation and Resilience.

The Community Ecology Center will provide opportunities for people and organizations to calculate their “Carbon Footprint” (the amount of GHG they emit) and provide corresponding actions that can strategically reduce those footprints. Workshops and information sessions will be the platform for discussing the methods of calculations, recommendations for reductions such as carbon sequestration gardens, energy efficiency options and habits that can reduce carbon output.

The Community Ecology Center will assist residents and their communities in building resiliency in conjunction with mitigation and adaptation efforts through a series of educational workshops with topics such as emergency preparedness, urban forestry, water conservation, sustainability, supporting local farms, gardening, and how to engage with local and state political initiatives and planning.

https://www.communityecologyinstitute.org/climate-action.html

And speaking of climate change —

County Executive Ball Announces Major Commitments to Climate Action [EXCERPTS]

COLUMBIA, February 26, 2019

Howard County Executive Calvin Ball today made a series of environmental commitments that will make the County a leader in environmental sustainability, reduce emissions and stem the causes of climate change. The news conference was held at the County’s Robinson Nature Center, a LEED Platinum facility operated by Howard County Recreation and Parks.

(by Howard County Government)

“It will be on all of us to continue to lead by example in the fight against climate change,” said Ball. “As your County Executive, I pledge bold leadership to make Howard County a safe and healthy place for generations to come.

The Maryland Commission on Climate Change (MCCC) reports that our state is already seeing the effects of a rapidly changing climate, posing a threat to the health, security, and prosperity of our communities. From these threats, there is also opportunity – opportunity to support a green economy in Howard County where our residents receive training and gain critical skills that enable them to be successful in the green jobs of the future.”

Howard County has signed on to [The Paris Agreement] and will aim to reduce greenhouse gas emissions of County government operations 45 percent below 2010 levels by the year 2030 and reach zero emissions by 2050. This will be accomplished by reducing County energy use, lowering its fuel consumption, and increasing renewable energy generation on County property. To learn more, visit https://www.wearestillin.com/organization/howard-county-md

Additionally, Ball committed to reduce land waste by announcing the expansion of the curbside food scraps collections area that will include almost 10,000 additional homes to the program. These residents will receive a postcard with signup information about the service which is set to begin on April 1st. The expanded area being served will include parts of the Villages of Owen Brown and Oakland Mills.

https://www.howardcountymd.gov/News/ArticleID/1419/News022619b#prettyPhoto

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Help the Community Ecology Institute save this Columbia farm

It’s a six-acre organic farm smack dab in the middle of Columbia’s Hickory Ridge Village that the Shaw family has worked for almost 40 years. The nonprofit Community Ecology Institute (CEI) wants to save the farm from development but needs to raise $300,000 by the middle of May to make it happen. There are a multitude of reasons why we need to support them.

Chief among them is CEI understands the impact that climate change may have on our community. They are committed to being a model for sustainable practices and teaching the skills of Mitigation, Adaptation and Resilience. Learn about their vision and help support it if you can. It’s a worthy cause and important for the future of Columbia and Howard County, Md.

Harry Schwarz – April 11, 2019

Community Ecology Institute: Growing a farm into a living classroom in Howard County [EXCERPTS]

Janene Holzberg (Baltimore Sun), March 22, 2019

Chiara D’Amore wants to transform a small organic farm in Columbia into a living classroom for the nonprofit she founded in 2016 with a mission to reconnect people to the natural world.

Community Ecology Center Site plan (courtesy of Community Ecology Institute) CLICK ON IMAGE FOR ENLARGED VERSION

D’Amore said CEI [Community Ecology Institute] is working to raise $300,000 to purchase Shaw Farm, a 6.4-acre property in a residential neighborhood near Atholton High School.

Having a facility at 8000 Harriet Tubman Lane would boost the nonprofit’s profile in the community and permit expanded programming, D’Amore said, while saving a 38-year-old family farm from development at the same time.

Aerial view, Shaw Farm (courtesy of Community Ecology Institute)

“There is a fire in me to protect this land,” said D’Amore, who has a master’s degree in environmental science and engineering and a doctorate in sustainability education.

If the farm purchase moves forward, a 4,000-square-foot barn on the property that is 75 percent finished would become classroom and office space.

The Shaw family sold organic produce for years at county farmers markets and donated thousands of pounds of vegetables and fruit to people in need, he said. They also sold produce in a community-supported agriculture program and later worked with food banks.

Shaw Farm (courtesy of Community Ecology Institute)

“Having been involved intimately with this land for almost 38 years, it is very important to me to find new stewards for the farm,” he stated.

“Working with Chiara and the other members of the Community Ecology Institute will ensure that my family’s values of clean air, water, soil and food — and putting people ahead of profits — will continue,” he wrote.

https://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/howard/bs-md-ho-community-ecology-institute-0324-story.html

The Community Ecology Institute

The Community Ecology Institute (CEI) is a Howard County based non-profit organization with a vision for a world in which human and natural communities thrive together. Our mission is to foster socially and ecologically healthy communities by enhancing the connections between all people and the natural world.

We are protecting this unique property from being developed and will be creating a Community Ecology Center where people can come to learn through hands on experiences about how they can have healthier, more sustainable lifestyles through:

  • Farm preservation & agricultural knowledge — There is little agricultural land left in eastern Howard County, especially in Columbia. Preserving this six-acre organic farm is a worthwhile endeavor in its own right!
  • Environmental sustainability & climate action — We will demonstrate and offer educational programming related to: conservation landscapes such as rain gardens, pollinator gardens, and food forests; . . . reducing waste through “refuse, reduce, reuse, and recycle” approaches; . . . energy and water efficiency; . . . and sequestering carbon in the soil.
  • Experiential education programming — CEI’s mission focuses on helping people develop strong connections with the natural environment because research shows how important such experiences are for people’s well-being, the generation of knowledge that makes a difference, and the cultivation of an active environmental ethic.
4,000 sq.ft. barn at Shaw Farm (courtesy of Community Ecology Institute)
  • Health & nutrition programming — farm to table programs that help the community connect with the benefits of eating local produce and space for community health practitioners to run programming
  • African American heritage programming — Local historians believe this area was an important point in the county’s Underground Railroad connections because 17 freed slaves were each given land in the community, hence the original name of Freetown.
Unfinished second floor of barn at Shaw Farm (courtesy of Community Ecology Institute)

https://www.communityecologyinstitute.org/community-ecology-center.html

Community Ecology Institute provides education on ways to mitigate climate change

As a coastal state and home to the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland is among the states most vulnerable to the effects of climate change through increases in sea levels, precipitation events, summer heat waves, and the frequency and intensity of storms. CEI is a signatory of the We Are Still In Agreement, and through the Community Ecology Center we seek to educate and support individuals, families, organizations, and communities on the local effects of climate change and empower them to harness local opportunities for action through Mitigation, Adaptation and Resilience.

The Community Ecology Center will provide opportunities for people and organizations to calculate their “Carbon Footprint” (the amount of GHG they emit) and provide corresponding actions that can strategically reduce those footprints. Workshops and information sessions will be the platform for discussing the methods of calculations, recommendations for reductions such as carbon sequestration gardens, energy efficiency options and habits that can reduce carbon output.

The Community Ecology Center will assist residents and their communities in building resiliency in conjunction with mitigation and adaptation efforts through a series of educational workshops with topics such as emergency preparedness, urban forestry, water conservation, sustainability, supporting local farms, gardening, and how to engage with local and state political initiatives and planning.

https://www.communityecologyinstitute.org/climate-action.html

And speaking of climate change —

County Executive Ball Announces Major Commitments to Climate Action [EXCERPTS]

COLUMBIA, February 26, 2019

Howard County Executive Calvin Ball today made a series of environmental commitments that will make the County a leader in environmental sustainability, reduce emissions and stem the causes of climate change. The news conference was held at the County’s Robinson Nature Center, a LEED Platinum facility operated by Howard County Recreation and Parks.

(by Howard County Government)

“It will be on all of us to continue to lead by example in the fight against climate change,” said Ball. “As your County Executive, I pledge bold leadership to make Howard County a safe and healthy place for generations to come.

The Maryland Commission on Climate Change (MCCC) reports that our state is already seeing the effects of a rapidly changing climate, posing a threat to the health, security, and prosperity of our communities. From these threats, there is also opportunity – opportunity to support a green economy in Howard County where our residents receive training and gain critical skills that enable them to be successful in the green jobs of the future.”

Howard County has signed on to [The Paris Agreement] and will aim to reduce greenhouse gas emissions of County government operations 45 percent below 2010 levels by the year 2030 and reach zero emissions by 2050. This will be accomplished by reducing County energy use, lowering its fuel consumption, and increasing renewable energy generation on County property. To learn more, visit https://www.wearestillin.com/organization/howard-county-md

Additionally, Ball committed to reduce land waste by announcing the expansion of the curbside food scraps collections area that will include almost 10,000 additional homes to the program. These residents will receive a postcard with signup information about the service which is set to begin on April 1st. The expanded area being served will include parts of the Villages of Owen Brown and Oakland Mills.

https://www.howardcountymd.gov/News/ArticleID/1419/News022619b#prettyPhoto

Ellicott City Flood and Flooding [An update from 2016]

As we attend to the immediate needs of the residents and businesses affected by this week’s flood in Ellicott City, people are asking “Why does this keep happening and what can be done to prevent it?” I attempted to address this question with a blogpost from August 3, 2016 following the last major storm.  

Much planning has been done in the last two years and several major projects are being implemented. The basic issues remain. We’re going to have to consider now whether these last two storms represent a new normal and whether the plans are sufficient. As always, it’s a judgement about the extent that we’re going to battle mother nature or adjust to her ways. 

Ellicott City – The Great Floods

Lower Ellicott City had been prone to flooding since it was founded. There has been at least four different major floods in recorded history in Downtown Ellicott City. So what makes it so prone?

First of all, Ellicott City sits at the confluence of the Tiber and Patapsco Rivers. This in itself moves a lot of water. Another issue is that Ellicott City sits in a shallow valley, with many of the expanding buildings and homes having to be build literally over the Tiber river. This makes water from almost all directions converge in the valley to the Tiber River before being emptied in the Patapsco. And this isn’t even the biggest issue.

Modified
Tiber River watershed, adapted from Google Maps

Continue reading Ellicott City Flood and Flooding [An update from 2016]

Howard County has a “Dakota Access” pipeline right in our back yard

Who knew we have petroleum pipelines running through Howard County MD? On a recent doctor visit out Dorsey Hall Drive in Ellicott City, I discovered these signs for a petroleum pipeline managed by Colonial Pipeline Company. Surprised by my finding, I decided to do some research. Come to find, there are numerous natural gas and hazardous liquid (petroleum) pipelines throughout Howard County and the USA.

Colonial Pipeline right of way (ROW) looking south across Dorsey Hall Dr. and US29 (left) and headed north to Marriottsville and Dorsey Junction in Woodbine (right) [photo by Harry Schwarz]
Map showing pipelines traversing Howard County, MD; The Colonial pipeline is indicated by the red line (map by National Pipeline Mapping System (NPMS) Public Viewer)

Pipeline Basics

by The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, US Dept of Transportation (PHMSA)

The energy transportation network of the United States consists of over 2.5 million miles of pipelines. That’s enough to circle the earth about 100 times. These pipelines are operated by approximately 3,000 companies, large and small.

Most hazardous liquid and gas transmission pipelines are located underground in rights-of-way (ROW). A ROW consists of consecutive property easements acquired by, or granted to, the pipeline company. The ROW provides sufficient space to perform pipeline maintenance and inspections, as well as a clear zone where encroachments can be monitored and prevented. Continue reading Howard County has a “Dakota Access” pipeline right in our back yard

Contact your Local Senator and Delegates to Ban Rolling Coal in Maryland

For the second year in a row, Delegate Clarence Lam (Democrat District 12, Howard/Baltimore County) has introduced a bill (HB-11) to make rolling coal illegal in Maryland. And what is rolling coal?   

“Rollin’ Coal” Is Pollution Porn For Dudes With Pickup Trucks

We waste a lot of food; In sink garbage disposals make the waste worse!

In the season just past of great foods and feasts, I’m mindful of the amount of food waste we generate. Obviously, there are huge amounts of wasted food in restaurants, and there are always leftover scraps from family dinner.  What we do with that waste has environmental consequences.

It is estimated that 40 percent of food in the United States goes uneaten, and perhaps 25% of household food.  Uneaten food is reportedly the single largest component of U.S. municipal solid waste landfills.  And 93% of us in Howard county have Insinkerators that flush scraps down the drain, requiring that it be processed by Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant or Patapsco Wastewater Treatment Plant in Baltimore City.

https://www.nrdc.org/sites/default/files/wasted-food-IP.pdf

The Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant in Howard County, Maryland (photo by Atkins Global)
The Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant in Savage, Maryland (photo by Atkins Global)

There’s a better way.  Howard County has now made composting food scraps even easier! Residents in the collection areas can now “Feed The Green Bin” with all of their food scraps, including meat, fat, and dairy; other residents can drop off food scraps at the Alpha Ridge Landfill.  And there are efforts to divert still edible food to people and places that can use it.

What’s Going Down Your Drain
by HoCo Office of Community Sustainability — 12/21/16

Wow! We had a great response to our garbage disposal survey. Here’s what we learned… Continue reading We waste a lot of food; In sink garbage disposals make the waste worse!

Suburbia is not Sustainable; Appropriate Densities are Better

Residents of Columbia, Maryland are objecting to the increased urbanization that is developing in the Downtown. Alas, it means cutting down a lot of trees that long-time Columbians have gotten used to. But suburbia is not sustainable, and perhaps Jim Rouse, the founder of Columbia, knew this. He always intended that Columbia have a real downtown and he set aside the land surrounding Merriweather Park at Symphony Woods, known as the Crescent (pictured above), for this purpose.

Increased densities in appropriate locations throughout suburbia, such as the Crescent and the Village Centers in Columbia, are the right thing to do. Here’s why:

Some Background

More than half of Americans live in suburbs, and about 75 percent of postwar construction has happened in the suburbs. That is a lot of people, and a lot of Continue reading Suburbia is not Sustainable; Appropriate Densities are Better